Archive for the ‘ DJ Industry ’ Category

The Music Marketing Manifesto. Ten Principles For Success

These are some pretty smart principles and are relevant for DJs and producers.  I’m a big fan of Music Think Tank as they have in depth articles about the music industry that are really helpful and actionable.  For a description of each of these principles click on the article link below.

1. Write, record and play high quality music

2. Continue to only deal in high quality

3. Be your own biggest critic and biggest promoter

4. Register with the PRS For Music

5. Plan to release music – never just release it

6. Promote before the release

7. Don’t create fake hype – be honest and humble

8. Understand the rules and the realities

9. Remember relationships aren’t built with a Like or a Follow

10. Think in stories and cycles

http://www.musicthinktank.com/blog/the-music-marketing-manifesto-ten-principles-for-success.html

DJ STEREOTYPES

DJ Pauly D For SK Energy Shots

<begin rant/>

I’m heading into very controversial waters here but something has been nagging me for a long time.  In the past few years I have noticed an increase in the use of the DJ image as a prop or selling tool.  Far be it from me to stop the machine from promoting what we do but the executions are such trainwrecks it begs the question of what’s the point?  Brands, typically, like to target a certain demographic of people – usually young usually hip.  So if the current zeitgeist is DJ friendly you will see DJing everywhere – in commercials, in print, in movies, on billboards, in advertising in general.  My issue with this is that brands and their marketers really aren’t very savvy when it comes to profiling DJing in the work.  Have you ever noticed a commercial where you can just tell the person is not a real DJ and just an actor.  That burns.  There are so many DJs out there, why not use a real one!  Or how about the major screw up in the Smirnoff campaign where there is a dude hunched down in an exaggerated DJ pose (of course there’s a gorgeous lady looking intently at him) and there are NO slipmats or needles on the decks.  Google it, trust me, MAJOR screw up.

When I see these things I think of that scene in Goodfellas where Joe Pesce keeps saying to Ray Liotta, “What am I fucking clown? Am I here to amuse you?”  I really feel we are here to amuse people sometimes.  There is stereotyping going on and whether it’s a caricature or not it gives people a really mixed message about what DJs are and what they do – which is a HUGE complaint in DJ culture – the lack of understanding from mass audiences about what we do.  So in essence, these messages are perpetuating an idea that we are props and in some cases the clown or party jester.  It’s nice to know that we are considered the embodiment of cool in a social setting, but do it right!

I will say there are some instances where it is done right.  Case in point, is the Blackberry campaign that profiled The Martinez Brothers in quite a thoughtful and sweet way.  They showed them playing their own music and just talking about what they do.  Sure were they shilling for a gadget, of course, but I don’t think it’s wrong for a DJ to endorse a tool that makes their lives easier (whether it’s for real or not).  The point is that it felt authentic, not a send up, no hype, real artists.

I was lucky enough to consult on a video shoot that had a party scene for a popular website.  The producer, Maryann Rounseville, took great pains in wanting a real DJ not only to capture in the video but also to play real music during a full day shoot because she knew the value of a real DJ and keeping the energy of all the actors and crew up and happy.  That’s rare and I applaud her for that approach and sensitivity.

Finally I just to want leave you with the image above of Pauly D.  I was walking in Times Square and this huge billboard was up.  I have mixed feelings about it.  Again, I do not want to fault a DJ for endorsing a product but is this the best way to show who we are with illustrated decks, cutesy musical notes, hands in the air with no crowd and just product product product?  I’m thinking no.

Pay attention to what’s going on if you aren’t already.  You’re going to start noticing it and the next time you ask yourself why don’t people get it, you may want to consider stereotyping as a possibility.
</end rant>

ATTACK OF THE 50FT HOUSE HEAD

The New York Dance Music Coalition just posted this article from Forbes titled “House Music Has Become a Global Phenomenon” by Dan Schwabel a contributor who writes about workplace trends and culture shifts.  Right away, you’re probably thinking what is a workplace trends guy doing writing about House music.  Well, I guess the fact that he writes about culture shifts covers it?  I think it’s kind of a broad distinction and a cop out to cover an entire subculture.  I’m not going to critique the article – I will leave that up to you.   What I find actually FASCINATING are the comments posted by people on the article – that’s the real gem here.  I will share with you some of the more colorful commentary and I encourage you to monitor this article series (Schwabel intends to post over the course of a few weeks interviews with top DJs) as well as contribute your thoughts on the comment threads.

To date the following responses that I find hilarious:

“Thank you Captain Obvious!” – Jeremy R.

“Insert personal story, brief 80′s paragraph about house music in Chicago, and a group of 30K ft-level summarizations about popular house music events/realities already well know…Effective means of roping in a younger audience to forbes media. Darn it, Got Me! Cheers. I look forward to the articles beginning Monday..” – Bobby Cottrell

“House music has brought together people from different social classes and different colors and ethnic backgrounds well before Guetta. I do not like that he is given credit here for something that was done by the masses, not just him.” – Elliot Matos

“All the people mentioned in that article have NOTHING to do with HOUSE MUSIC! Isn’t it so annoying when people who nothing about a scene or culture attempt to write about it. It’s POP, period. That’s it. Nothing else. It sucks like most other modern pop. Pop was good in the 60′s and that’s it. Forbes stick to proper finance. Music industry is not a good example of proper business. Stick to oil, gas, gold, banks et al.

That is all.” – Nick Navaro

The reason I’m sharing this with you is because anytime you believe, as a DJ, that no one gets you or the scene is dead this is a quick shot in the arm to remind you that people actually do care and are invested in maintaining the integrity of the culture.  Consider the reaction and the ferocity of it against a publication like Forbes – these people are not buying into the BS and they are being vocal about it.

Segue into a new DJ tool I was turned onto called TopDeejays.com.  As someone who is very critical on any kinds of data and analysis of our culture I think these guys nailed it.  The information on the site is based on a number of data points that factor into a DJs popularity.  They also do genre trending on a global scale.  AND you can register a DJ to help build the largest database of DJs out there.  It is your one stop shop for DJ data!  I know it seems like I’m crazy about these measurements (see: DJ Mag Top 100: Why The Controversy) but it’s time we are smarter than mass media – even if it’s publications that document our culture.  Or else we have Forbes speaking on our behalf – yikes!

DJ Mag Top 100 – It’s Not DJ Mag’s Fault There Are No Women, It’s Ours.

Source: Spinoff Comics

In Part 2 of my review of the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs controversy ( for Part 1 go here: Why The Controversy? ) I’m tackling the issue of why there aren’t any women on the list.  In years past there used to be women in the top 100 but this year there aren’t any – not one.  And people are really pissed off about it.  However, I think the public statements about this only hit the tip of the iceberg.  Peaches told DJ mag to go eat a dick – which I think is placing blame in the wrong place, although personally I appreciate her hutzpah. Hanna Hanra from The Guardian goes into how tough it is for women today and the overall general disrespect women face when playing out ( Why are there no female DJs on DJ Mag’s top 100 list? ) – an important topic but not the core reason.

If we are to assume the list is generated by mainstream tastes – who are the most recognizable DJs – and assuming DJ Mag’s main demographic is male, the lack of women DJs on the list can be due to the fact that we are not mainstream or male.  Sorry to say, but there are no women selling out stadiums or working with top 40 artists in the way that David Guetta is for example.  Fiona Walsh, founder of Clubber’s Guide NY, offers this opinion: “The followers of DJs like David Guetta and Armin Van Buren, while both men and women, tend to skew towards young men. I think the DJs we know and like who are women are not necessarily making the kind of ‘popular’ music like Guetta and AVB! We need a female DJ version of someone like Lady Gaga or Madonna!” I’m not going to get into a who’s who of the best female artists – for that check out SheJay’s Top 100 Female DJ list (thank goodness someone did it!) because I want to address the question of why women are not top of mind in this vote.  First – there aren’t that many of us, and second, culturally, we are not considered authority figures.

There Aren’t That Many Of Us:

I’m trying to find a statistic on the percentage of female DJs versus male DJs and it’s tough because no one is really calculating these kind of things but if I could take a wild guess I would say that female DJs account for maybe 10% of the global population of DJs. Now, one of the reasons why there aren’t many of us isn’t just the barriers that are presented to us when we enter DJing or are active with it – it starts much earlier than that.  There have been studies done on how girls and boys are socialized in this world.  While boys are taught and encouraged to understand mechanics at a young age, girls are taught to be more conceptual or focus on dolls and being pretty.  Boys = told they are smart and encouraged be individualistic (you are alpha).  Girls = told they are pretty and to think of others before themselves (you are beta).  I had to fight for my right to be a tomboy when I was a kid.  While playing with my Matchbox cars and Legos asserting my dominance with the boys in my neighborhood because I was the only girl and didn’t have a choice, my mother was trying to ease Barbies into my play and telling me that when I say something I should say it in the form of a question so as not to offend people.  Girls are not socialized to understand how things work from an engineering standpoint and therefor we grow up a little bit behind the curve on that.  It takes a special kind of woman to unlearn that socialization and go against that DNA.  For women in general, the idea of circuitry, gear, individualism, and being Alpha is a side of our minds we need to tap into, and it’s not something that is nurtured in our culture.  Hence a possible reason why more women aren’t getting into DJing.

We Aren’t Viewed As Authorities

There’s something that is already inherent in male privilege and that is that men are automatically considered a leader or an authority.  It is our culture basically to give men that level of respect without question.  Women are generally not considered born leaders – we have to earn it and in some cases fight for it.  We have to work twice as hard to be thought of as half as good – with anything.  Now, what is a DJ?  A DJ is considered an authority in music, the leader of the experience, the architect of the journey.  That understanding and energy is automatically attributed to a male perspective and for women it’s not an attribute automatically given to us.   So it should be no surprise that men are generally more respected and known in the DJ community – it’s human nature to think of them first when considering who is best in a given domain, especially one that is as male dominated as DJ’ing.  Also, fans and DJs who revere another DJ is in a lot of cases because they want to BE that DJ – it’s an emulative feeling.  So, if the voters are mostly male they will probably vote for men as that is who they want to emulate ( the authority, the skill, the talent, etc. ) This is why when the DJ Mag Top 100 list comes out there are hardly any women on it – because when people vote in an open ballot system without prompting (as in “hey, don’t forget to think of women in your votes”), they think of the men first, and the rest of us, not at all.

Now, I know what I’m saying is disappointing and difficult to hear because we all want to believe that DJ’ing is a fair and equitable art to pursue, but it’s not sometimes.  Once we understand the essence of why women are not in the same position as men in DJ’ing we can do something about it.  The  main insight for women here is that we can use our socialization to our advantage – we are brought up to be nurturers, caretakers, artistic and conceptual.  Well, that’s what a DJ is as well!  The DJ is a caretaker and nurturer of a good time, a therapist catering to the many emotions experienced on a dance floor.  Women are goddesses of establishing purpose in art and instilling self-worth in people.  We are highly musical because we are emotional and empathic beings.  We can also channel our frustration and anger in being discounted back into our DJing and fight to change things: through music, collaboration, and support. We are going to understand why things are the way they are, and we’re going to do something about it.  It is our collective responsibility to ensure that women’s contribution in DJing is recognized and honored.  DJ culture is asking us to do that – the proof is in the list.

DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs – Why The Controversy? Part 1

Disclaimer: I voted this year online and viewed the results online.  If anything I say in this post is inaccurate, as I do not have access to the print version of DJ Mag, PLEASE bring it to my attention.  Thank you.

Few things cause more controversy in DJ land as DJ Mag‘s Top 100 DJs list that comes out every year.  Based on an open ballot system where people actually write in their favorite DJs it is constructed in a way to try to accurately determine who are the world’s top DJs.   What I find fascinating is the things we can actually learn just by looking at the list in an analytical way.  Because the votes are write in only it could be suggested that DJ Mag’s Top 100 reflects truly the pulse of what people like.  However, being someone who likes to analyze this kind of information I can’t help but offer my opinion on what is going on and how it can be done better.

If you are a DJ and you haven’t voted in DJ Mag’s Top 100 vote I highly encourage you to do so.  Without input from us what you end up getting is mostly results of the current fanbase which is fine and we might need to look at the results in that way.  I’m curious as to the percentage of DJs vs. fans that actually vote – a metric that I think is important for DJs to understand when looking critically at the results.  As we all know there are DJ’s DJs and there are fans DJs.  What is most important to understand from the results is that the methodology in collecting them is as fair and open as it gets. So it’s kind of like, if you don’t vote, you can’t complain about the results.

I do not question DJ Mag’s purpose or hands off involvement.  I do not think it’s rigged (maybe I’m being naive), I think it’s an accurate summary of what’s going on.  However, I contend that some underlying truths have not been revealed because they’re actually not being captured. There is a bigger story here that I think is missing in the discussion and the controversy this list causes.  First, it’s context.  I do not claim to know DJ Mag’s exact demographic – some say it’s a mainstream magazine that caters to more commercial tastes in DJs, others feel it’s the best publication out there covering everything there is in DJ land above ground and underground, I think it’s a little bit of both – serving DJs and fans.  So we must understand the audience and the context of DJ Mag as a publication before we can really analyze the results for what they are.  Since we don’t really know that information to be sure, arguing about the results is a little misdirected.  Secondly, the list is just a list.  The only information that is captured is name, email address, location, gender and your votes.  There’s no information presented as to percentage of people from certain locations or gender breakdowns on voters, which could be presented but isn’t.  So we don’t really learn anything more than a vote tally ( which is a missed opportunity on DJ Mag’s part in my opinion ).

There’s two crucial things we as DJs need to know about this list before we can make any judgement on the results.  First, what is the DJ vs. Fan breakdown in voters and secondly, what is the criteria people use to decide to vote for a DJ.  If DJ Mag could ask a simple question such as “Why are you choosing this DJ for your vote?” there would be a big learning here – basically why people choose who they choose. This is an oversimplified method to be sure, but I’m just putting it out there that this is information that can be shared. It could quell a lot of the controversy or at least open up an honest and informed conversation about DJ’ing – from what is expected of us to what is considered a measure of success.  If we do not know exactly what is going on, we can’t address it or change it.

My opinion is when people get upset or there’s controversy over something like this it’s because they’re not getting the full story – the WHY.  If all that is being offered is the WHO then it’s no surprise that people ( DJs and Fans alike ) get upset about this list.  It’s simply, they want to learn more about WHAT this information means ( to them and the culture at large ) and they are left with too many open questions about it.

On October 27th DJ Mag came out with two points of order on their Facebook wall:

Two points of order.

1. DJ mag is merely the guardian of the poll. It does not reflect our taste in music.

2. The poll is not solely an EDM poll – it is open to every DJ – from Chinese Hip Hop artists to scratch DJ’s

As to there being no female DJ’s on the list we are as surprised as you are, as there are a number of 1st class female DJ’s across various genres.

However the vote is an open and public vote and the Top 100 reflects the choice of you the voter.

I intend to address these points in future posts but I want to put it out there that we as DJs need to pay attention not only to what these results are telling us but also that there’s more that needs to be learned before we make assumptions as to what it all means.  We need to be fair about it – even if we’re unhappy with it – there’s a lot to learn from something like this, even more than we’d like to admit.

For my DJ Mag’s Top 100 DJs Part 2 – It’s Not DJ Mag’s Fault There Are No Women – It’s Ours go here: http://behindthedecks.org/2011/11/23/dj-mag-top-100-its-not-dj-mags-fault-there-are-no-women-its-ours/

UPDATE 11/25/11: DJ Tech Tools has done a very interesting analysis on the list “using stats from social media websites, to see who has the biggest following”.  To check out their findings and illuminating insights ( the math is sound in my opinion ) go here: http://www.djtechtools.com/2011/11/18/the-dj-techtools-top-100-dj-list/

Contracts, Divas, and the Dancefloor: Things that can go wrong

Things happen and then things can go stupendously wrong.   This post is about protecting your sanity and the sanctity of the gig.   This is only the tip of the iceberg – share with me your stories ( I’m opening the comment thread on this post ) so others can learn from you.  The point is that there are many things you can do to avoid some of the problems that occur at a gig BEFORE they happen.

The Contracting Process:

When you sign up for a gig, aside from the usual who-what-when-where-why, it’s really important to know the unspoken details – they’re unspoken for a reason.  Check out the venue the week before on the same night or previous night you are spinning.  Read the reviews on the venue.  It’s important to know your venue.  What are the management’s expectations? Do they promote their venue at all? Of course you need to bring people but get a sense of how many. Some venues have a bar guarantee – in other words if the bar doesn’t make a certain amount of money, you are on the hook to pay the difference if the bar doesn’t make it.  Even if they don’t, it’s important to ask on average how much the bar makes on that night.  Do not delude yourself on the numbers.  Even in NYC a $4000 bar minimum is nothing to mess around with – you would be surprised how hard it is to reach a number like that.  I’ve seen packed floors not even reach $2K. You also should probably know by now that management may not always be honest with the numbers so as not to have to pay your rightful percentage – it’s tough economic times for venues and fuzzy math is commonplace. Make sure you ask questions – if the venue has multiple bars, for example, do they all factor into your minimum or only the one you are directly spinning near?  Very important: get something in writing!  I know it’s scary to present a venue with a contract or agreement of some kind but when you are dealing with money, especially if you are getting paid or on the hook for a certain number, you need something in writing.  At the very least, make sure communications with the management are emailed.  You also need an agreement with the management regarding music and gear.  Too many times I have seen DJs assume they can play their usual only to find out the management was expecting something else or worse, promoted the night as that something else.  I have seen DJs that were told there is a set up and walk in to find things missing or the system in shoddy condition.  IMPORTANT: Arrive as early as you can to a gig to check out the situation in case there is a problem – you have time to rectify it.

Promoters:

There are good promoters and there are not so good promoters.  Do not take what promoters (or anyone for that matter) say at face value.  Do your homework. See if anyone has worked with them.  Look at their site, social network, etc.  Really understand who you’re dealing with.  Do not agree to pay them a flat fee – if that’s what they ask for, run do not walk.  They should be paid by the number of people they bring in – not people on a list, people who actually show up.  I’ve seen DJs agree to a flat fee and sign on promoters who basically just blasted out an event on Facebook ( to mostly fake Facebook profiles or people not even in the country of the gig ).  Make sure that promoter runs in a similar circle as yours and also ask them what their promotion schedule is, if they are promoting another gig close to the date of yours chances are they will promote heavily the gig that enhances their reputation best ( which is understandable ) – hopefully that is your gig, but if it’s not you’re out of luck as they are not going to burn out their main resource, their people.

Menacing on the Dancefloor:

I love great dancers I really do.  But sometimes floor hoggers can clear a floor faster then you can blink your eye.   Most people enjoy watching them for fifteen minutes or so but then they want to get back on the floor.  If the dancers do not oblige you have a potential problem on your hands.  There is a certain danger people feel when there are dancers doing windmills and back flips in a small space – no one wants to get hit.  So people leave never to come back.  Also, be mindful of bad energy on the dancefloor – overall menacing can also effect things ( you or your DJ partner should always be walking through the floor checking on the energy ).  Alert staff – don’t try to deal with it on your own.  Remember you are the protector and nurturer of a good time ( See Building the Foundation of a Dance Floor ) and if there is an element that is negatively affecting the floor you must do something about it.  It is your job to keep that floor filled and happy, your success is judged on it – don’t let some bad apples ruin it for you.

Check the party schedule in your area:

This is obvious but often a forgotten detail.  It’s very important to know what parties are going on at the same time you are considering your date.  If a superstar DJ is in town or there are three huge warehouse parties going on at the same time you may want to reconsider the date of your party.

The lineup:

Another obvious and overlooked detail.  Know who you’re spinning with.  Listen to their mixes, see them play out.  I’ve seen DJs put other DJs in the lineup having never heard a mix only to find out too late that the DJ isn’t a good fit or worse, too junior to be up there. Also, it used to be that you could have a lineup where you have different styles of music all in one night ( ah, those were the days! ).  Now you have to really think about how to put your line up together.  Make sure you create your lineup based on the kind of DJ a person is – warmup, peak, 2am, closer.  Do not put someone who is a good warmup DJ in the 2am slot even if you are feeling pressure from that DJ.  You know your lineup, you know your vision for the party.  If they don’t like it – get someone else, you don’t need the headache of a diva.

Which leads me to . . .

Divas

If you have a diva on your hands – suck it up.  There is enough information out there and word of mouth that is known about DJs reputations so you should have known about them before you engaged them.  If a DJ is that important enough that you need to deal with it then you have accepted the responsibility.  Do your best to accommodate them and hope they bring it.  If they don’t then you have every right to call them out on it after the gig.  If you have a wasted DJ on your hands, keep an eye on them, if they are barely functional keep the previous DJ on or get the next DJ in the lineup ready.  DO NOT PUT A WASTED DJ UP THERE – they will effectively screw up and ruin the floor.  You are also protecting their reputation – it’s better they don’t go up there than do go up there and ruin their name.  They may curse you that night, but will thank you for it in the morning. Oh, and it’s up to you if you want to pay them anyway – it may be a good idea just to keep the peace and not cause a scene but totally understandable if you don’t want to because they have a personal issue with self control. Your call.

Do not expect DJs in the lineup to bring anyone:

You have to operate as if you are the only one bringing people.  Do not rest until you have done everything in your power to get the word out.  Do not factor anyone else’s people into the number you are expecting to show up ( that includes promoters ).  If people show up for other DJs/promoters – consider that a bonus.  Too many times I have seen DJs counting on other people to bring a crowd only to have that DJ/promoter not bring a single person.   It’s a cruel disappointment.

The Door

Make sure the person at the door and the bouncers know your entrance policy and the name of your party.  Make sure they are aware of what the guest list means – is it a reduced list or is it a free entrance list.  Make sure the bouncers/door person have a way to reach you in case there’s an issue at the door.  The best thing to do is have someone be responsible for all the non-DJ things that go on at your party – a trusted friend/organizer.  If you don’t have that person then you need to work out with your DJ partner monitoring the situation when not spinning.

Like I said this is just the tip of the iceberg of things to be mindful of, I would love to hear your stories as well.  You can’t control everything that happens but you can do your best to try and avoid these issues in the first place.

Recap: DON’T sign on for a gig and ask questions later.  Know your venue ( and your DJs! ).  Watch the floor, have ownership of it. Don’t assume anything.  If you want things done right, you have to take it upon yourself to make sure it gets done right ( or do it yourself ).

Open Question: What’s Next for DJing?

I firmly believe that DJ’ing and DJ culture as a whole has evolved so beautifully and elegantly. It continues to be an artistic pursuit that provides transformational experiences for many people (good job everyone!).  I was thinking – what’s next for us?   I’m musing on the stages of evolution for an art form and trying to frame it in terms of DJ culture.  I brainstormed a list of phases below.  I’m trying to work out what’s next for us and how we can keep evolving.  I can honestly say, I think our future is strong but also delicate.

I’ve kept the descriptions of each phase very general ( and somewhat cryptic ) because I want you to have some reference to what I mean – I’m sure I missed other ways to describe these phases.  Ask yourself these questions too: Where are we exactly in this spectrum in relation to DJ culture and in relation to music performance at large ( bands for example )?  Is a particular phase a function of location?  What important events have occurred or need to occur in music or technology that ushers in one phase from another?

Phases of evolution of the art of DJ’ing:

  • Pioneering – the first DJs.
  • Foundation – Small group of DJs working out the mechanics and method, the art form is being established.
  • Exclusiveness – Underground only for the select few.
  • Momentum – Forums for public performance, complete support.
  • Exponential Growth – DJs and market is fully immersed and mass audience are knowledgeable that DJs exist.  Variety of tool sets available.
  • Peak  –  Market saturation. Expectations and pressures at all time high.  Full understanding of tool sets. Potential for backlash.
  • Plateau – Technique/musicality is in stasis, longer periods of time between innovation which occur as blips not milestones.  DJs creatively regrouping. Backlash and commercialization evident.
  • Resurgence – Time has passed, less faithful and creative weeded out (although this can occur in any phase), core remaining group building foundations for next level.   Audience returns/new audience injects fresh energy and ideas.
  • Climb – Lessons from previous phases are applied.  Respect of art form re-established.  Fresh perspectives become norm.  Next phase in evolution is in full swing.

Another way to look at this list is as a cycle.  It’s quite possible you can apply the first phases to something that is happening right now in a particular technique, performance or genre.  That’s great – go for it.  The point is to find your center of understanding and take it from there.

I ran this by a trusted DJ.  We talked about when looking at it from music and performance history as a whole, DJs have only just begun (Exclusiveness/Momentum).  Looking at it from the inside, from the NYC DJ perspective, we are just cresting Exponential Growth and into Peak (again, debatable).  My gut feeling is we’ve got a potential bump in the road no matter what.  That’s Plateau. We need to think seriously about Plateau.  In my opinion, it could be the longest lasting and sedentary stage – triggering the next phase will be tough.  However, we could look at this way: Plateau might be what we need in order to take a breather and regroup from Peak.  I’d like to think that’s what Plateau can do for us, the questions still come however – are we there yet to even think about it, do we fight it or let it happen, is the concept even relevant for our culture?  I wish I had the answers.

Recap: We are evolving.  Where are we? What do we do about the possibility of Plateau? If you feel we are in a certain phase, think about what you can do as an artist to deal with the current situation and adapt/change/set yourself apart.

I’ve created a poll below.  I am curious as to where you think we are. Unfortunately, the poll doesn’t allow me to finesse location or your criteria for your answer so write to me if you want to explain or discuss this post further (BIO).